OTC Futures

Trade the global markets

OTC Futures at ICM Brokers

Online trading in OTC derivatives with ICM Brokers enables investors to take advantage of swift order execution on a variety of commodity, energy, financial, and index futures instruments.

These highly liquid instruments are traded on market execution basis with tight market spreads, low margin requirements and multiple order entry capability. OTC futures instruments are cash-settled with no delivery allowed.

OTC Futures Instruments at ICM Brokers

  • Energy/Commodity OTC Futures
    Crude Oil, Natural Gas, Sugar
  • Financial OTC Futures
    Euro, British Pound, Japanese Yen, Swiss Franc, Canadian Dollar, Australian Dollar
  • Index OTC Futures with ICM Brokers
    DJ, NASDAQ, S&P

Advantages of Trading with ICM Brokers

  • Swift online order execution
  • Tradable on market spreads on ‘market execution’ mode
  • Competitive margin requirements allowing for increased exposure to the market
  • Initial margin requirements of $1,000 per standard lot; no maintenance margin
  • Multiple order entry capability including stop, take profit and limit orders
  • No slippage on limit and stop orders
  • Extensive charting tools and financial news to add value to your trading experience

About the Futures Market

Futures contracts are derivative instruments that are standardized in quality, quantity and delivery in order to facilitate trading. They are derived from traditional commodities as well as other non-traditional asset classes and are traded on various exchanges around the world on margin basis.

The buyer of a futures contract has the obligation to take delivery of the underlying asset as per the contractual terms of the exchange. Conversely, the seller must deliver the underlying product or instrument under the terms of the contract. Of course both parties may dissolve their commitment by closing out their contracts prior to settlement date. If the futures contract is cash-settled, the trader who sustains a loss must consequently settle with the clearing house (usually part of the exchange), which acts as a guarantor and transfers the funds to the trader who made a profit.